Free shipping on ALL plant orders!

Corylus americana

American hazelnut add to wishlist

Plant types and subtypes: Trees & Shrubs, Shrubs, Deciduous

Light Requirements: sun, part-sun, part-shade, shade

Water Use: medium

Soil Moisture: dry, moist

Soil Description: neutral, rich, average

Height: 6'-12'

Bloom Time: March, April, May, June

Bloom Color: green

Leaf Color: green

Hardiness Zone: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Additional Tags: attracts birds, clumping, colonizing, fall interest, hedging plant, naturalizing, shade garden plant, showy fruit

Corylus americana (American hazelnut)
  • Corylus americana (American hazelnut)
  • Corylus americana (American hazelnut)
  • Corylus americana (American hazelnut)
  • Corylus americana (American hazelnut)

Pricing & Availability

Description

Corylus americana

Also known as:

American hazelnut

,

American filbert

Scientific Synonyms:

Description

Corylus americana is a deciduous shrub valuable for its ornamental qualities and its production of edible nuts. It is multi-stemmed, dense, and usually reaches a mature height of 12', though it can grow taller under some circumstances. Each plant bears both female flowers and male catkins. The leaves are somewhat heart-shaped and in fall turn vivid shades of yellow to red, and even purple. The fruit are acorn-like, smaller than those of the European commercialized species, but equally delectable. The zig-zagging stems provide good visual interest in winter when bare of any foliage.

Cultivation

American hazelnut is very easy to grow, and tends to form dense colonies and thickets by means of rhizomes. It prefers rich, moist well-drained soils, but can tolerate dryer conditions in more shade and is also found in wetter areas such as along stream banks. It can be planted in full sun, but will tolerate full shade at lower elevations. It can be pruned anytime, used as an ornamental lawn specimen, as a hedging plant, or to naturalize large areas. Flowering times will vary from March to June. Zones 4-8

Propagation

Easily propagated from seed. If previously stored, these will require a period of cold stratification to break dormancy. New plants will begin producing fruit after their first year, and abundant crops every 2 to 3 years. Can also be propagated by digging up and transplanting suckering roots. It is possible to propagated from cuttings though success rates are low using this method.

Additional Notes

There are few down sides to this species if any, and the abundant production of nuts is a bonus. Nuts and catkins are a valuable food source for birds and mammals, large and small. Thickets provide valuable shelter for wildlife.

Native Range & Classification

Recorded County Distribution: USDA data

Native Range:
AL, AR, CT, DC, DE, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, VA, VT, WI, WV

Classification

Kingdom Plantae Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta Vascular plants
Superdivision Spermatophyta Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida Dicotyledons
Subclass Hamamelididae
Order Fagales
Family Betulaceae Birch family
Genus Corylus hazelnut
Species Corylus americana American hazelnut