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Hepatica nobilis var. obtusa

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Plant types and subtypes: Perennials

Light Requirements: part-shade, shade

Water Use: medium

Soil Moisture: moist

Soil Description: neutral, rich, average, loam, sand

Height: 4"-8"

Bloom Time: March, April

Bloom Color: white, pink, lavender

Leaf Color: green, purple, multi-color

Hardiness Zone: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Additional Tags: clumping, colonizing, fall interest, ornamental foliage, rock garden plant, shade garden plant

Hepatica nobilis var. obtusa (roundlobe hepatica)
  • Hepatica nobilis var. obtusa (roundlobe hepatica)
  • Hepatica nobilis var. obtusa (roundlobe hepatica)

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Description

Hepatica nobilis var. obtusa

Also known as:

roundlobe hepatica

,

round-lobed hepatica

,

round-leafed hepatica

,

liverleaf

Scientific Synonyms:

Anemone americana, Anemone hepatica, Hepatica americana, Hepatica hepatica, Hepatica triloba var. americana

Description

The anemone-shaped flowers of the roundlobed hepatica may be pink or lavender, sometimes even white. They appear in early spring, on a single hairy stalk no more than 8" tall, well before the first leaves. As the common name suggests, it has round, lobed leaves. Foliage is very attractive with soft purple veins and remains evergreen, dying back in late winter before the first blooms appear.

Cultivation

Hepatica nobilis var. obtusa is found in the moist undergrowth of upland deciduous forests, more commonly with northern exposures where the plants will remain cool during summer. It is easy to grow in average soils and is tolerant of dryer woodland conditions. It is slow to spread, and can be used very effectively in shaded rock gardens where fall and winter interest might otherwise be lacking. Blooms in early spring, March or April. Zones 3-8

Propagation

Best left undisturbed. Groups of several offshoots may be separated from mature plants in fall. Moist, cold stratification is required when propagating from collected seeds.

Additional Notes

Almost identical to the Hepatica nobilis var. acuta, it my be distinguished by its rounded leaves and deeper colored flowers.

Native Range & Classification

Recorded County Distribution: USDA data

Native Range:
AL, AR, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, IA, IL, IN, KY, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, NC, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, SC, TN, VA, VT, WI, WV

USDA Endangered Status:

  • Endangered: FL
  • Special Concern: RI

Classification

Kingdom Plantae Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta Vascular plants
Superdivision Spermatophyta Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida Dicotyledons
Subclass Magnoliidae
Order Ranunculales
Family Ranunculaceae Buttercup family
Genus Hepatica hepatica
Species Hepatica nobilis var. obtusa roundlobe hepatica