Rare

Named for Ben Franklin, saved by the Bartrams.

September 16, 2016

Named for Ben Franklin, saved by the Bartrams.

Franklinia alatamaha is probably the rarest of all trees native to North America. The species was discovered in 1765 along the Altamaha River, in southeastern Georgia, by famed botanists and horticulturists John Bartram and son William.  Ultimately, they named the species in honor of their dear friend Benjamin Franklin. William went back a few years later to collect seed which was successfully propagated. Were it not for this fortuitous discovery, and the recognition of having found something exceptional, this species, last observed in the wild in 1803, would now be extinct. Franklin tree soon became an attraction at Bartram’s Garden; the oldest botanic garden in the country, on 46 acres along the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia. read more

New RARE species Streptopus lanceolatus var. roseus, just added.

July 23, 2014

New RARE species Streptopus lanceolatus var. roseus, just added.

Endangered within its native range, and even harder to find in cultivation!

For sale NOW, $8.95 each, minimum order of 3.

Pricing is valid for a limited time only, while supplies last.

Streptopus lanceolatus var. roseus (twistedstalk) is a native herbaceous perennial of the Lily family. It is easy to grow in a cool, shaded spot with moist and organically rich soil. 

DESCRIPTION: The species name provides an excellent physical description of the plant: strepto, from the Greek, means twisted, and describes the zigzagging stem; lanceola, from the Latin, means lance-shaped, and describes the leaves; and finally roseus describes the pinkish color of the bell-shaped flowers.

The stems of Streptopus lanceolatus var. roseus  are usually uninterrupted, though some stems might be branched on larger, mature specimens. read more

New RARE Species for sale: Trautvetteria caroliniensis

July 10, 2014

New RARE Species for sale: Trautvetteria caroliniensis

Beginning to feel the summer heat?

Trautvetteria caroliniensis (Carolina bugbane) is a cool plant for part-shade to full shade. Give it a nice, rich, moist spot, and it will rapidly form a ground cover of ornamental, 12” across, deeply lobed foliage.

It is one of the few shade plants to bloom during summer, and it does so in a spectacular way. Long lasting, fragrant, white, feathery orbs develop atop stems that extend 2’ to 3’ above the foliage. How cool is that? read more

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