Sales of containerized plants have ended for 2017.

Please check back in spring 2018 for our full line of plugs, quarts, and more. Sign up for our email list or follow us on Facebook to stay informed.

Bare root sales continue throughout the winter.

Oenothera fruticosa ssp. tetragona

narrowleaf evening primrose add to wishlist

Plant types and subtypes: Perennials

Light Requirements: sun, part-sun, part-shade

Water Use: low

Soil Moisture: dry, moist

Soil Description: acid, neutral, average, poor, clay, sand, gravel/rock

Height: 1'-2'

Bloom Time: June, July, August

Bloom Color: yellow

Leaf Color: green, blue-green, red

Hardiness Zone: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Additional Tags: attracts bees, attracts butterflies, attracts hummingbirds, drought tolerant, evergreen, naturalizing, rock garden plant

Oenothera fruticosa ssp. tetragona

Pricing & Availability

Description

Oenothera fruticosa ssp. tetragona

Also known as:

narrowleaf evening primrose

,

Scientific Synonyms:

Kneiffia glauca, Kneiffia hybrida, Kneiffia latifolia, Kneiffia tetragona, Oenothera fruticosa var. glauca, Oenothera fruticosa subsp. glauca, Oenothera glauca, Oenothera riparia, Oenothera tetragona, Oenothera tetragona subsp. glauca, Oenothera tetragona var. fraseri, Oenothera tetragona var. hybrida, Oenothera tetragona var. latifolia

Description

Oenothera fruticosa ssp. tetragona has undergone many name changes. It was once commonly known as Oenothera tetragona, and is now often referred to as Oenothera fruticosa ssp. glauca. To be consistent with our nomenclature, it is Izel Plants' policy to adhere to the name accepted by the USDA. Up to 3" long, the leaves of this species are larger and broader than those of O. fruticosa. They are also deep-green to blueish-green, and are often conspicuously tinged with red. The cup-shaped, four-petaled flowers are also a bit larger than those of O. fruticosa, and tend to be slightly more pale. The flowering stems are up to 2' tall and form dense clusters. They die back late in the season, just as new basal rosettes begin to form. These will persist through winter, acquiring bronzish tones.

Cultivation

Narrowleaf evening primrose is a tough little plant, easy to grow under difficult conditions. It is well adapted to poor, dry soils and blooms profusely when grown in full sun. It also does well under more typical garden conditions with rich moist, well-drained soil, and can tolerate light shade. The blooming period lasts 3 to 5 weeks during summer, and can be extended by cutting back the spent flowering stems. It tends to spread more readily vegetatively by underground stems, than it does by seed, to form dense colonies. It is however non-aggressive, and very easy to control. Zones 3-8

Propagation

Easy to propagate by seed, or by transplanting the new basal rosettes in spring or fall. It can also be propagated by making stem cuttings before the flower buds emerge.

Additional Notes

This species is an excellent choice for rock gardens and sunny borders. Its non-aggressive habit, and evergreen rosettes, also make it an ideal filler plant with year round interest.

Native Range & Classification

Recorded County Distribution: USDA data

Native Range:
AL, CT, DC, DE, GA, ID, IL, KY, LA, MA, MD, MI, MO, NC, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, SC, TN, VA, WV

Classification

Kingdom Plantae Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta Vascular plants
Superdivision Spermatophyta Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida Dicotyledons
Subclass Rosidae
Order Myrtales
Family Onagraceae Evening Primrose family
Genus Oenothera evening primrose
Species Oenothera fruticosa ssp. tetragona narrowleaf evening primrose