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Passiflora incarnata

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Plant types and subtypes: Perennials, Vines

Light Requirements: sun, part-sun, part-shade

Water Use: low, medium

Soil Moisture: dry, moist

Soil Description: acid, neutral, alkaline, rich, loam, clay, sand

Height: 10'-30'

Bloom Time: April, May, June, July, August, September

Bloom Color: violet, purple, pink, lilac, lavender, blue

Leaf Color: green

Hardiness Zone: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Additional Tags: attracts birds, attracts butterflies, berries, climbing, drought tolerant, edible, fragrant flowers, medicinal, showy fruit

Flower of Passiflora incarnata (purple passionflower)
  • Flower of Passiflora incarnata (purple passionflower)
  • Flower of Passiflora incarnata (purple passionflower)
  • Foliage of Passiflora incarnata (purple passionflower)
  • Fruit of Passiflora incarnata (purple passionflower)

Pricing & Availability

Description

Passiflora incarnata

Also known as:

purple passionflower

,

passionflower

,

maypop

,

apricot vine

Scientific Synonyms:

Description

Purple passionflower is renown for its spectacular and intricate, large purplish flowers. This is a rapid growing vine that clings to its support by means of tendrils. The large fruit are yellowish when ripe, and edible. The common name maypop, is derived from the popping sound the fruit makes when crushed.

Cultivation

Easy to grow in full sun to light shade, Passiflora incarnata is also adaptable to a wide variety of soils, and is quite drought tolerant. Given proper support and enough room, it can grow by more than 10' in one season. In the south, it is considered evergreen and will develop woody stems. In the north, it will die back to the ground in winter. It will bloom for several months, as early as April, and as late as September, depending on geographic location. Zones 6-10

Propagation

Propagate from seed or cuttings. Mature plants will also produce suckers, which can easily be separated and transplanted.

Additional Notes

The genus got its name, because its flower structure was said to represent various aspects of the Christian crucifixion story. The leaves and roots have been used in teas, tonics, poultices, to treat cuts and inflammations, as well as to sooth nerves.

Native Range & Classification

Recorded County Distribution: USDA data

Native Range:
AL, AR, DC, DE, FL, GA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, OH, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV

USDA Endangered Status:

  • Rare: IA
  • Threatened: OH

Classification

Kingdom Plantae Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta Vascular plants
Superdivision Spermatophyta Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida Dicotyledons
Subclass Dilleniidae
Order Violales
Family Passifloraceae Passion-flower family
Genus Passiflora passionflower
Species Passiflora incarnata purple passionflower