Free shipping on ALL plant orders!

Ratibida pinnata

pinnate prairie coneflower add to wishlist

Plant types and subtypes: Perennials

Light Requirements: sun, part-sun

Water Use: low

Soil Moisture: dry, moist

Soil Description: average, poor, clay, sand

Height: 3'-5'

Bloom Time: July, August, September

Bloom Color: yellow

Leaf Color: green

Hardiness Zone: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Additional Tags: attracts bees, attracts birds, attracts butterflies, colonizing, cottage garden plant, cut flowers, naturalizing

Ratibida pinnata (pinnate prairie coneflower)
  • Ratibida pinnata (pinnate prairie coneflower)
  • Ratibida pinnata (pinnate prairie coneflower)
  • Ratibida pinnata (pinnate prairie coneflower)
  • Ratibida pinnata (pinnate prairie coneflower)

Pricing & Availability

Description

Ratibida pinnata

Also known as:

pinnate prairie coneflower

,

prairie coneflower

,

gray-head prairie coneflower

,

drooping coneflower

,

grayhead coneflower

,

yellow coneflower

,

grayhead Mexican hat

Scientific Synonyms:

Lepachys pinnata, Rudbeckia pinnata

Description

Ratibida pinnata is a striking wildflower with robust, sparingly leaved branching stems that can grow to a height of 5'. The large terminal flowers are stunning, with bright yellow, drooping rays that are up to 3" long, and a conspicuous disk that starts out slightly domed and gray, becoming dark brown and cone-like as the seeds ripen. The leaves are pinnate (feather-like) and divided, hence the specific epithet "pinnata" (nothing to do with a Mexican "piñata"). Although the flowers are not fragrant, their disk will exude an anise-like aroma if rubbed or crushed.

Cultivation

Ratibida pinnata is easy to grow in average, well-drained soil, in full to part-sun. It is low maintenance, and mature plants can be considered drought resistant. It can be used in cottage gardens, planted in tight groups to compensate for the sparse appearance of the individual stems. They can have a tendency to flop over if grown in overly rich, moist soil, and might require additional support or staking under those conditions. It is long-lived and has a robust, rhizomatous root system that will form tight clumps over time. Great for use in naturalized settings, among other tall wildflowers and grasses. It enjoys a long blooming period that can last up to 2 months, between early to late summer. Zones 4-8

Propagation

Easily propagated from fresh or stored seeds. Can be propagated by clump division in early spring.

Additional Notes

Pinnate prairie coneflower is very attractive to pollinators, and combines beautifully with other tall, summer-blooming perennials such as Monarda fistulosa and Agastache foeniculum. It is an excellent candidate for cut flowers. Native Americans used the flowers and cones to make tea, and the roots to sooth toothaches.

Native Range & Classification

Recorded County Distribution: USDA data

Native Range:
AL, AR, CT, FL, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MI, MN, MO, MS, NE, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, SC, SD, VA, VT, WI, WV

USDA Endangered Status:

  • Extirpated: PA

Classification

Kingdom Plantae Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta Vascular plants
Superdivision Spermatophyta Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida Dicotyledons
Subclass Asteridae
Order Asterales
Family Asteraceae Aster family
Genus Ratibida prairie coneflower
Species Ratibida pinnata pinnate prairie coneflower