Rudbeckia hirta

blackeyed Susan add to wishlist

Plant types and subtypes: Perennials, Biennials

Light Requirements: sun, part-sun, part-shade

Water Use: low

Soil Moisture: dry, moist, wet

Soil Description: acid, neutral, alkaline, rich, average, poor, loam, clay, sand, gravel/rock

Height: 1'-3'

Bloom Time: June, July, August, September, October, November

Bloom Color: yellow

Leaf Color: green

Hardiness Zone: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Additional Tags: attracts bees, attracts birds, colonizing, cottage garden plant, cut flowers, deer resistant, drought tolerant, naturalizing, pond margin plant, rock garden plant, stream margin plant

Rudbeckia hirta (blackeyed Susan)
  • Rudbeckia hirta (blackeyed Susan)
  • Rudbeckia hirta (blackeyed Susan)
  • Rudbeckia hirta (blackeyed Susan)
  • Rudbeckia hirta (blackeyed Susan)

Pricing & Availability

Description

Rudbeckia hirta

Also known as:

blackeyed Susan

,

common black-eyed Susan

,

brown-eyed Susan

Scientific Synonyms:

Description

Rudbeckia hirta flowers are probably the typical image that comes to mind when thinking of wildflowers. Though it is actually a biennial, we are also including it in our perennial category due to its ability to self seed and to establish permanent colonies. The daisy-like flowers are yellow with a brown cone-like center (eye) and about 3" across. These are smaller than most commercially available cultivars. Rudbeckia hirta may also be distinguished by its hairy leaves. Single flowers appear atop 1' to 3' stems.

Cultivation

Saying that this species is easy to grow could be an understatement, seeing that native populations have been recorded throughout the US in all but 2 States, and as far north as Alaska. Rudbeckia hirta is tolerant of drought as well as occasionally waterlogged soil. It does best in full sun, but can tolerate a considerable amount of shade. This species will bloom for several months. Depending on geographic location, the bloom period may begin as early as June and last until frost. Deadheading spent flowers will increase bloom production, however, this is a short lived species and some flowers should be allowed to go to seed in order to maintain permanent colonies. Zones 3-10

Propagation

Allow plants to self seed. Collected seeds may be started indoors in early spring, or sowed directly outside after the last frost date.

Additional Notes

Blackeyed Susans are very adaptable and versatile. Use them to create borders, colorful accents in a cottage garden or to naturalize in open spaces. A good cut flower in flower arrangements. Flowers attract nectar loving insects such as bees and butterflies, seeds attract birds and small mammals. Highly deer resistant.

Native Range & Classification

Recorded County Distribution: USDA data

Native Range:
AL, AR, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, WY

USDA Endangered Status:

  • Endangered: NY

Classification

Kingdom Plantae Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta Vascular plants
Superdivision Spermatophyta Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida Dicotyledons
Subclass Asteridae
Order Asterales
Family Asteraceae Aster family
Genus Rudbeckia coneflower
Species Rudbeckia hirta blackeyed Susan