Free shipping on ALL plant orders!

Sanguinaria canadensis

bloodroot add to wishlist

Plant types and subtypes: Perennials, Ephemerals, Ground Covers

Light Requirements: part-shade, shade

Water Use: medium

Soil Moisture: moist, wet

Soil Description: acid, neutral, alkaline, rich, loam, clay, sand

Height: 6"-12"

Bloom Time: March, April, May

Bloom Color: white

Leaf Color: green, gray-green

Hardiness Zone: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Additional Tags: deer resistant

Flower of Sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot)
  • Flower of Sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot)
  • Flower of Sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot)
  • Flower of Sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot)
  • Foliage of Sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot)

Pricing & Availability

x

Some plants might not be available to you due to quarantine restrictions, or nursery limitations.

To make it easier for you to buy locally, we will sort the available nurseries based on their distance to your garden.

Description

Sanguinaria canadensis

Also known as:

bloodroot

,

Scientific Synonyms:

Description

Bloodroot emerges in early spring as a single, vertical leaf, wrapped around a single flower bud. The solitary white flower appears before the large, deeply cleft, green-gray leaf has completely unfurled. When planted in masses, the foliage will provide an attractive, low growing (up to 12 inches), ephemeral groundcover through mid to late summer, at which point the plants will go dormant and die back.

Cultivation

Native to rich woodlands and shaded stream margins, Sanguinaria canadensis will do well in a variety of moist, well drained soils, where it will rapidly form colonies. It can tolerate more sun in cooler climates. The attractive flowers open during the day and close at night. However, as with other members of the Poppy family, these blooms are short lived. An early spring bloomer; March through May. Zones 3-8

Propagation

Propagate from seed, sowing immediately after collection, or by division in fall or early spring.

Additional Notes

Bloodroot contains morphine-like alkaloids that can be highly toxic if ingested. The red sap, for which the genus is name "Sanguinaria", which means blood, was used as a dye by Native Americans. It can however harm the skin, therefore plants are best handled with gloves. Bloodroot has been used as a cure for skin cancer and other ailments, but its medicinal properties are still being evaluated.

Native Range & Classification

Recorded County Distribution: USDA data

Native Range:
AL, AR, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA, VT, WI, WV

USDA Endangered Status:

  • Exploitably Vulnerable: NY
  • Special Concern: RI

Classification

Kingdom Plantae Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta Vascular plants
Superdivision Spermatophyta Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida Dicotyledons
Subclass Magnoliidae
Order Papaverales
Family Papaveraceae Poppy family
Genus Sanguinaria bloodroot
Species Sanguinaria canadensis bloodroot