These species will be available for sale as bare root plants throughout the 2017/18 winter months.

Come spring, some of these species will also become available in containers, including quarts, plugs, and more. Stay up to date by subscribing to our newsletter, or by following us on Facebook.

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Viola pedata

birdfoot violet add to wishlist

Plant types and subtypes: Perennials

Light Requirements: sun, part-sun

Water Use: low

Soil Moisture: dry, moist

Soil Description: acid, poor, sand, gravel/rock

Height: 3"-6"

Bloom Time: March, April, May, June

Bloom Color: violet, purple, lilac

Leaf Color: green

Hardiness Zone: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Additional Tags: attracts bees, attracts butterflies, colonizing, drought tolerant, rock garden plant

Viola pedata (birdfoot violet)
  • Viola pedata (birdfoot violet)
  • Viola pedata (birdfoot violet)
  • Viola pedata (birdfoot violet)
  • Viola pedata (birdfoot violet)

Pricing & Availability

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Some plants might not be available to you due to quarantine restrictions, or nursery limitations.

To make it easier for you to buy locally, we will sort the available nurseries based on their distance to your garden.

Description

Viola pedata

Also known as:

birdfoot violet

,

bird foot violet

,

birdsfoot violet

,

bird's foot violet

Scientific Synonyms:

Viola pedata var. concolor, Viola pedata var. lineariloba, Viola pedata var. ranunculifolia

Description

Viola pedata is easily identifiable among other species in the genus, because of its deeply lobed leaves resembling a 'birdfoot'. The flowers are particularly large, growing up 1 1/2" across. Bloom color can be variable, ranging from pale-blue to dark-violet, or even bicolor. This is a well-behaved, low-growing species that forms neat clumps up to 10" across and 6" tall.

Cultivation

Birdfoot violet is adapted to poor soil in full sun. It will tolerate some light shade, and moist soil, so long as it is very well-drained. The biggest liability for this species is root rot. It can also be crowded out by more aggressive species if grown in an environment that is too rich or moist. Unlike most violet species, Viola pedata rarely produces rhizomes, and it does not spread vegetatively. It blooms from mid, to late spring, and may experience a second blooming period in fall. Ideal for dry, sunny borders, sandy soil, and rock gardens. Zones 4-9

Propagation

Although it may be propagated by root cuttings made in early spring, this is a risky procedure. Best propagated by seed. Seeds that are stored over winter will require a period of cold moist stratification.

Native Range & Classification

Recorded County Distribution: USDA data

Native Range:
AL, AR, CT, DC, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, NC, NE, NH, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, RI, SC, TN, TX, VA, WI, WV

USDA Endangered Status:

  • Exploitably Vulnerable: NY
  • Threatened: NH, OH

Classification

Kingdom Plantae Plants
Subkingdom Tracheobionta Vascular plants
Superdivision Spermatophyta Seed plants
Division Magnoliophyta Flowering plants
Class Magnoliopsida Dicotyledons
Subclass Dilleniidae
Order Violales
Family Violaceae Violet family
Genus Viola violet
Species Viola pedata birdfoot violet